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While the corn industry and agribusinesses would have you think, according to their recent commercials that high fructose corn syrup is the same as cane sugar, numerous research studies indicate otherwise.

Glucose and fructose are both sugar molecules used by the human body to power many of its cellular processes. But several studies, have linked  the fructose added to processed foods – in the form of high-fructose corn syrup – to obesity and overeating. 

Recently a group of  nutrition and mental health experts have identified what they believe is an explanation for the effect high-fructose corn syrup has on eating habits.

Researchers at the Oregon Health and Science University used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).  They measured the brain activity of nine healthy adults. Each adult was given an injected solution of either fructose, glucose or water.

Those given glucose demonstrated less activity in the cerebral cortices, which are areas of the brain responsible for and the sense of taste and smell.

On the other hand, participants injected with fructose showed greater than average cortical activity. The team theorized that fructose, especially the form found in high-fructose corn syrup, may negatively impact the brain ability of people consuming it to avoid processed foods.

Sugary  foods have contributed to the growing problem of obesity in the U.S., which many health authorities have labeled an "epidemic."

Currently, two-thirds of Americans are either overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Glucose and fructose are both forms of sugar, utilized by the human body to power many of its cellular processes. However, research has linked the fructose added to processed foods – in the form of high-fructose corn syrup – to obesity and overeating.

Now, a team of nutrition and mental health experts has found what they believe is an explanation for this form of fructose's effect on eating habits.

Using magnetic resonance imaging, researchers from Oregon Health and Science University measured the brain activity of nine healthy adults. Each adult was given an injected solution of either fructose, glucose or water.

Those given glucose reportedly showed less neural activity in their cerebral cortices, which are areas of the brain responsible for the senses of taste and smell, as well as for exercising restraint.

On the other hand, participants injected with fructose showed greater than average cortical activity. The team theorized that fructose, particularly that found in high-fructose corn syrup, may negatively affect the neurological ability of eaters to avoid processed foods.

Sweetened foods have contributed to the growing problem of obesity in the U.S., which many health authorities have labeled an "epidemic."

Currently, two-thirds of Americans are either overweight or obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Source: Oregon State University

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